Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1987, Sidney J Furie)

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Spoiler warning: these reviews reveal plot twists.

Lex Luthor creates a henchman called Nuclear Man – but can he defeat Superman?

Good guys: A final appearance as Clark Kent/Superman from Christopher Reeve. Despite this film’s phenomenal and fundamental failings – some of which must be laid at his door because he has a ‘Story by’ credit and was a de facto producer – he’s been superb. The best ever actor in the role, I’d say. At the story’s start, in a subplot that doesn’t go anywhere, Clark is selling the farm he grew up on but is wary of property developers (“We don’t need another shopping centre…”). When an earnest schoolboy who clearly needs to find a hobby asks Superman to rid the world of nuclear weapons, the Man of Steel feels guilt-tripped into doing it. His decision comes after an atrociously realised scene in which Clark jumps off a balcony while holding onto Lois Lane’s hand, then switches to Superman on the way down. It seems that putting her in fear of her life is preferable to just telling her his secret. He then collects all the nuclear weapons in the world (no, really) and puts them in a huge sack in space (I’m not making this up) and flings it into the sun. When Nuclear Man appears on the scene, Superman comes off second-best in their first fight and begins to artificially age. But after he fiddles with the last remaining Kryptonian crystal, he feels okay – so heads off to defeat his new enemy. Lois, meanwhile, is learning French for some reason so drops bits of the language into her dialogue. She’s on a subway train – clearly filmed on the London Underground! – when the driver has a heart attack and Superman has to save everyone. She learns Clark’s secret identity (again), but then forgets it after a kiss (again). Sadly, Margot Kidder is pretty poor. For whatever reason, she lacks the zip and confidence from the first couple of movies.

Bad guys: Gene Hackman is back as Lex Luthor, who’s in prison as we begin (he’s been given hard labour, it seems). After he escapes, he plots to clone his own version of Superman; after that plan fails, he ends up back in the same prison camp. Otis and Miss Teschmacher have vanished from his life, so as a sidekick Lex has roped in his nephew, Lenny. Jon Cryer (terrific as Duckie in Pretty in Pink, a bit annoying here) does what he can – loud outfit, crazy haircut, flash car, surfer-dude drawl – but the character doesn’t make much impact. Nuclear Man himself is played by Mark Pillow, though Hackman dubbed the dialogue (for some reason). According to one of the film’s writers, the original intention was for Reeve to double up to play Nuclear Man. That would have been more interesting, though maybe there was a worry of echoing the Clark vs Superman fight from the previous film.

Other guys: Back from earlier films are: Jackie Cooper as Perry White, who’s so annoyed by what’s happening to the Daily Planet that he organises a bank loan to buy a controlling stake in it; Marc McClure as Jimmy Olsen, who stands around doing nothing in three scenes; and Susannah York in a voice-only cameo as Superman’s mum. Sam Wanamaker plays David Warfield, a tabloid tycoon who’s bought the Daily Planet and is, I guess, a parody of Rupert Murdoch. His daughter, Lacy (Mariel Hemingway), has big glasses, big shoulder pads and a big crush on Clark Kent. She isn’t the soulless business-bitch you first assume her to be and is one of the film’s few successes.

Best bits:

* Well, it’s not the tacky, cheap opening credits. (Tempting though it is to actually list all the film’s Worst Bits, I’ll stay positive from now on…)

* Clark returns to Smallville and the farm seen in film one. It’s a decent match, especially when you consider that Superman: The Movie filmed in Canada and Superman IV filmed in Hertfordshire.

* Clark hits a baseball into space.

* Lex refers to Lenny as the Dutch elm disease of his family tree.

* Lacy’s mock-up for a new-style Daily Planet: red logo, sensationalist headline, saucy photograph. It’s The Sun, basically.

* Lacy, casually: “All men like me. I’m very, very rich!”

* Oh, look: it’s Robert Beatty as the US President.

* Lacy reclines on her desk in an unsubtle attempt to flirt with Clark.

* Oh, look: it’s Porkins from Star Wars, Howard from Ever Decreasing Circles and Roy Slater from Only Fools and Horses as a trio of arms dealers.

* Clark at the gym, acting like a doofus.

* The six-minute sequence where Lois and Lacy go on a double date with Clark and Superman – so, of course, he has to keep finding excuses to leave and then come back in as the other persona. It’s good fun, but could do with being directed more briskly.

* Lex’s penthouse has some gorgeous Art Deco furnishings.

* Oh, look: in the deleted scenes available on the DVD, Clive Mantle from Casualty plays a prototype version of Nuclear Man (a character entirely cut from the film). I worked with Mantle once. Nice guy. We discussed talking books and agreed that people who buy the abridged versions are pussies.

Review: Abysmal. Boring. Cut-price. Depressing. Empty. Flawed. Gaudy. Hapless. Inept. Jumbled. Klutzy. Lobotomised. Moribund. Nasty. Odd. Perfunctory. Quizotic. Rubbish. Sloppy. Tatty. Useless. Vulgar. Witless. UneXciting. Yawnsome. Zzzzzzzzzzzz. I couldn’t improve on this assessment from Screen Junkies:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWNqbqcV4dU

Two strands of Superman’s hair out of 10.

Next time: Ever danced with the devil in the pale moonlight?

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