Wonder Woman (2017, Patty Jenkins)

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Spoiler warning: these reviews reveal plot twists.

Living god Diana Prince leaves her home on a mystical island of Amazons to help American spy Steve Trevor during the First World War…

Good guys: This film is part of the DC Extended Universe series, so we’ve seen lead character Diana Prince before. Thankfully, actress Gal Gadot is better here than she was during her cold, one-note contribution to Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. The bulk of Wonder Woman is a flashback set a century ago… The young Diana lives on a Mediterranean island which is magically cut off from the rest of the world, populated solely by females, and where everyone trains to be in an army that doesn’t have anyone to fight. Two women bicker over Diana’s future: her aunt, Antiope (Robin Wright), wants her to learn how to fight; but her mother, Queen Hippolyta (Connie Nielsen), wants to keep Diana safe. (All the women on the island speak in a vaguely Middle-Eastern accent, presumably to complement Gal Gadot’s Israeli voice.) Then a biplane appears in the sky. An American spy called Steve Trevor (Chris Pine) has (somehow) stumbled across the island and tells Diana and co about the war. “War?” she says. “What war?” Learning about the horrors going on in Europe (it’s 1918, you see), Diana resolves to travel with Steve to London because she thinks Ares, the god of war, must be responsible. When they arrive, we meet Steve’s secretary: the nervy but very capable Etta Candy (Lucy Davis, who is so funny she very nearly steals the whole film). Then when Steve and Diana head to France to prevent chemical weapon being used by the Germans, Steve recruits three old colleagues. Sameer (Saïd Taghmaoui, decent) is a French Moroccan spy; Charlie (Ewen Bremner, likeable) is an alcoholic Scottish sharpshooter who’s clearly suffering from PTSD; and Chief Napi (Eugene Brave Rock, barely an actor) is a Native American smuggler.

Bad guys: The major villains initially seem to be the sadistic leader of the German Army, General Erich Ludendoff (Danny Huston), and his sidekick Isabel Maru aka Dr Poison (Elena Anaya), a Spanish scientist developing chemical weapons. Huston’s hamming it up – he thinks he’s in a more childish film – while Anaya makes little impression despite an interesting backstory and a Phantom of the Opera-style facemask. But they’re actually red herrings. In the London sequence, we meet British politician Sir Patrick Morgan (David Thewlis) and anyone who’s ever seen a movie before will probably guess that there’s more to him than meets the eye. He turns out to be Ares, another powerful living god and Diana’s evil half-brother.

Best bits:
* The early sequence on the magical island of Themyscira is quite flat and po-faced – it presents a world that’s difficult to believe in and has lots of clunky exposition – so it’s something of a relief when the 20th century crash-lands into the story. Chris Pine is absolutely terrific as Steve Trevor, bringing some much-needed charm, irony and urgency to the story. It’s a very Harrison Ford-y performance.
* Steve being interrogated by the Amazons. They use the Lasso of Hestia, a rope that compels people to tell the truth. “But it’s really hot,” says Steve. He then involuntarily blurts out, “I AM A SPY!”
* Steve sneaking into a German scientific base in the Ottoman Empire has the feel of Raiders of the Lost Ark as he steals an important notebook, jumps into a biplane, and drops a grenade as he escapes.
* Diana walks in on a naked Steve. “Would you say you’re a typical example of your sex?” she asks. “I am… above average,” he replies.
* There’s a lovely bit of movie logic on show here: leaving the island, which is near Turkey, Diana and Steve get into a small boat that sails along at about five knots. They fall asleep, but when Diana awakes they’re sailing up the Thames! “We got lucky, we caught a ride, we made good time,” is the lame line of dialogue Chris Pine has to toss off without looking too embarrassed.
* The London sequence is a triumph of production design, CGI and period detail. There’s also plenty of fish-out-of-water humour with Diana not understanding social conventions and etiquette. Steve takes her to Selfridges to get some Western clothes.
* Etta Candy is a marvel. Everything she says or does is both adorable and hilarious. Every eye roll or nervous vocal utterance is a joy.
* This area of the film also contains some knowing references to the 1978 Superman: Diana puts on glasses, struggles with a revolving door, and saves her human companion from a guy with a gun in an alley – all things Christopher Reeve’s Clark Kent did too.
* In order to prove he’s telling the truth about going to Europe to stop a genocide, Steve wraps the Lasso of Hestia around his own hand… then can’t stop himself admitting that it’s a terrible idea and they’ll probably be killed.
* Diana deals with a bully in a pub by throwing him across the room. “I’m both frightened and aroused,” says Sameer.
* Diana climbing out of the trench and marching across no-man’s land, rallying the British to follow her. It’s an unashamedly epic moment of rousing music, slow-motion photography and iconic hero poses.
* Steve and Sameer blag their way into a German castle where a gala is being held – Steve masquerades as a German colonel, Sameer as his driver.
* The Armistice celebration scene in Trafalgar Square – which was shot in the genuine location.

Review: What a lovely surprise. After three movies of gobsmacking ineptitude – Man of Steel, Batman v Superman and Suicide Squad – the DC Extended Universe gets on track. With a female lead (so rare in the superhero genre) and a female director (ever rarer), Wonder Woman shrugs off DC’s alpha-male obsessions with explosions, killings and carnage, and instead opts for heart, humour and a light touch. It’s very likeable stuff that zips along. But that’s not to say the film is perfect. Its feminist credentials, for example, are superficial. For all her barrier-breaking and popularity, Diana is still an objectively beautiful woman who parades around in a sexualised outfit while the men dictate the plot and explain things to her. It’s hardly Ellen Ripley or Sarah Connor. Her naivety is also sometimes difficult to fathom – she can speak hundreds of languages, yet doesn’t know what marriage is; she comes from a magical community of superhuman isolationists yet berates a middle-aged general for hiding in an office ‘like a coward’. The movie also has some dull villains, can’t resist an overblown climax of CGI nonsense, and repeats ideas from Captain America: The First Avenger a few times too many. But as a two-hour slice of popcorn cinema, this hits the spot. It’s fun, entertaining and charming.

Eight pairs of specs (suddenly she’s not the most beautiful woman you’ve ever seen) out of 10 

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